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SPOUT.jpg (6952 bytes)Make your own spout

By Marc Folco


Do you shoot blackpowder but are tired of those plastic pouring spouts that go on powder cans? They're hard to put on and take off and the little cap always breaks off.

Here's a neat little pouring spout that you can make at home with the factory can cover and a few simple things that you've probably got hanging around your reloading bench and work bench. It'll last a long, long time, costs only pennies and with the brass used, it's more in tune with blackpowder shooting than plastic.


Take the metal cap off your existing can of Goex powder (cover the can and get it away from the work area until the project is done). Remove the paint from the top of the cap and make sure the bare metal is roughed-up with a wire brush or sandpaper. Next, take a fired and empty 30-30 cartridge case and cut it off below the shoulder so that it's about an inch and a half long (smooth the sharp edges). Rough-up the case head (base of the case, where the caliber and brand stampings are), so the solder will stick. Solder the shortened 30-30 case to the center of the cap, flowing the solder completely around the rim of the case, sealing the joint. I have good luck with lead-free silver solder, paste flux and a propane torch. When cool, turn it over and using a three-sixteenths drill, drill a hole into the center of the base of the cap, so the powder will flow. The hole is drilled from the bottom, up through the can cap and through the case head because drilling from the case mouth down into the cap will gouge the mouth if the drill binds and twists. You now have the pouring spout. Next, take a fired and empty 30-06 cartridge case and cut it below the shoulder so that it's about an inch and three quarters long (smooth the edges). This will be the cap for the spout. The difference in diameters between the two cartridge cases (at the shortened lengths) causes the 30-06 cap to fit over the 30-30 spout with a friction-tight fit.

So you don't lose the cap, drill a small hole through the spent primer, screw in a small brass screw eye and solder it in place. Then, take the spout and drill a small hole in the top between the case rim and the edge of the can cover, Screw in a small brass screw eye and solder it in place. As soon as the solder flows on the eye joint, get the flame off it so it doesn't disturb the case joint. Take a length of rawhide (or stout cord) and tie one end to the eye in the spout and the other end to the eye in the cap, leaving about four inches between. Clean everything up with steel wool and the job is complete. Get your powder can, screw on the spout and push on the cap. Remember to never load directly from the can, flask, horn or other powder container, Always pour the powder into a powder measure first and then into the barrel.

Submitted by:
Marc Folco
Director fo MassSOS
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